Hungarian Registrars Group

History

The early history of the formation of the Hungarian Registrars Group is inseparably intertwined with the European Union’s collections mobility policy, along with an initiative started in 2003 which aims at sharing the common European heritage with European citizens.

One the one hand, Hungarian registrars have always been present at the grand cultural conferences of the European Union’s Presidency states, while on the other hand, they have actively participated in formulating landmark documents with strategic significance. Since these conferences and publications have always dealt with topics concerning the day-to-day work of registrars, such as state indemnity, immunity from seizure, long term loans and standard loan contracts, these documents set up a specific activity plan for registrars working in museums (beyond the level of the European Union and its member states) who are the most significant members of the process of implementing and adopting the principles developed by experts.

The last one in the line of publications is the more analytic handbook, Encouraging Collections Mobility – A Way Forward for Museums in Europe published in 2010.

Since 2009, the European Union supports the development of collections’ mobility in the form of working groups established by member states in Brussels, as well as by financing the Lending for Europe project.

Parallel to the European events began the organization of the first grand exhibitions in Hungary which, along with numerous hardships, resulted in huge development regarding Hungarian legislation: in order to realize the Monet and Friends exhibition in 2004, the state indemnity came into force in record time, while the Van Gogh exhibition called the construction of the state counter indemnity into being.

That was the time when Hungarian registrars started to make contact with each other and this resulted in an absolutely spontaneous, but at the same time highly effective connections network in the form of personal meetings, a mailing list, along with specific and quick help, thanks to which a great amount of money – state money in particular - was saved.

In a 2010 government regulation, the artefacts loan specialist (or museum registrar) was also included in the list of the scope of museum activities and thus the work of about 20 or 30 people with different qualifications, who do the most significant background work of preparing exhibitions, was justified on a legislative level.

With this website, we would like to strengthen and extend our relationship with Hungarian registrars. Furthermore, we would like to publicize the accumulated knowledge which has been collected in our field so that our successors, based on previous experience, could do this challenging job on a higher level.

II. Members: 
Péter Bodó – Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
dr. Boglárka Borbély - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Katalin Borbély - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Zsuzsanna Csáki - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Zsuzsanna D’Albini  - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Zsófia Egger - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Zsófia Farkas - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
dr. Henriett Galambos - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Annamária Gáspár - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
dr. Adrienn Gippert - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
dr. Szilvia Krajcsik - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery
Anna Váradi - Hungarian National Museum
dr. Judit Kata Virág - Museum of Fine Arts- Hungarian National Gallery